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There is a connection between the mind and the GI tract – the fact is, the brain isn’t creating or imagining the digestive troubles of the Crohn’s sufferer but it is involved in triggering them. There is a view that two mental states commonly associated with irritation in the GI tract are stress and depression.

Dr. Beaumont in his book, ‘Experiments and Observations on the Gastric Juice and the Physiology of Digestion’ was the first to prove that stomach problems as a result of stress were simply not in the sufferer’s head but rather a physiological response to increased production of gastric juice.

The past decade has witnessed a growing emphasis on the importance and clinical relevance of incorporating a multidisciplinary approach to address patients’ priorities and desires that includes specific attention to mind–body approaches in the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses. Despite growing evidence for its potential importance in the optimal management of chronic illnesses and patients’ desires, the integration of a holistic multidisciplinary approach toward GI illnesses, one that incorporates mind, body, and spirit, continues to be rare in both academic and private practices”.                               https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3744096/

Lifetime Health recognises the importance of this link in helping Crohn’s sufferers  and adopts an integrated mind/body approach in all treatments.